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Lambeth College LRC - Study Support: Harvard Style Referencing

Harvard Style Citation, Referencing & Bibliography

Harvard Style Citation, Referencing and Bibliography

References are necessary to identify sources of information used in written work. When producing an academic writing, you are required to acknowledge the work of others by citing in the text and creating references and bibliography at the end of your assignment. Citations, references and bibliography demonstrate you have knowledge of what has been written already about the subject. It also allows your tutor to check your research. You must never pretend that someone else’s idea is yours – this is called plagiarism

At Lambeth College we use the Harvard style, which is outlined in this guide to provide you a handy advice and examples how you can cite and reference for information sources you use to write your assignment.


What are the difference between References and Bibliography

The referneces list contains the full details of all sources you have summarised or quoted, plus any sources you use in your writing in alphabetical order by author surname.

Whereas a bibliography includes the full details of all source you have read in preparation to write your assignments which appear in your bibliography in alphabetical order by author surname.

Use the title or the name of institution for any source which does not have an author. It is important to be consistent in your references and bibliography, so always include the same information about your information sources in the same order, using the same font and punctuation.

 

referencing

 


In the Text Citations

When you refer to the work of an author in an assignment, you must always mention (cite) the author(s) in the text. This is called citing the author. Citing references within text refer the reader to your references list of the full details of all sources. This is written at the end of your assignment. From there, the reader can locate the original source.

Examples of citing within text

Below is an example of what citations look like in an essay or assignment.

Management theories have been investigated in many business studies courses since they were devised (Hemingway, 2006).


Quotations

 Direct quotation should be written with quotation marks, and the author’s name, date of publication and page number(s) in brackets and must be  written in a separate, indented, paragraph.

Below is an example of direct quotation.

"In academic writing it is essential to state the sources of ideas and information” (Cottrell, 2008, p. 130).


What to include in a referencing list or bibliography

 

Books

Use the title page and its reverse of the book to find the following information.

Author Surname, Initial.,

(year of publication).

Title: subtitle written in italics.

Edition  (if not the 1st edition).

Place of publication:

Publisher.

e.g.Cottrell, S., (2008). The study skills handbook. 3rd ed. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

Journals or Magazines

Use the front cover and the page with the publishing details to find the following information.

Author Surname, Initial.,

(year of publication).

Title: subtitle of the article.

Title of the journal in italics.

Volume number

(Issue or part number),

page numbers. 

e.g.Longfield, A., (2010). Families and social policy. Sociology Review. 20 (1), pp. 17-19.

 

Websites

The exact URL (Internet address) is available in the address field at the top of the your browser. The year the site was last updated is available at the bottom of the page. Also include the date you accessed the web page.

Author Surname, Initial., or

Organization,

(year the web page was last updated).

Title: subtitle written in italics.

Available on-line then the full URL address

(Accessed date, month ,year).

e.g. BBC, (2010).  Government to scrap M4 bus lane [Online]. Available at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-11451350 (Accessed 1 October 2010).

 


Sample of references or bibliography

List of references or bibliography should be included at the end of your assignment. The bibliography or references should look like as illustrated below.

  • Anderson, B., (2000). Management styles in the retail sector. Lewes: Pythagoras.
  • BBC, (2010).  Government to scrap M4 bus lane [Online]. Available at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-11451350 (Accessed 1st October 2010).
  • Cottrell, S., (2008). The study skills handbook. 3rd ed. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Hemingway, A., (2006). Introduction to management. London: Sage.
  • Longfield, A., (2010). Families and social policy. Sociology Review. 20 (1), pp. 17-19.
  • Spiller, D.L., (1986). Book selection: an introduction to principles and practice. 4th ed. London: Bingley.

Further sources of help

South Bank University Guide to Harvard Referencing System

Anglia Ruskin Guide to Harvard Referencing System


Sources

Lambeth College Library and Learning Resources, (2021). A brief Guide to Harvard Style Citation, Referencing and bibliography [Online]. Available at:https://moodle.lambeth.ac.uk/pluginfile.php/110223/mod_resource/content/7/Guide to Harverd Style Citation%2C Referencing and Bibliography.pdf (Accessed 15/02/2022).

LSBU Library and Learning Resources, (2022). Harvard Referencing Guide [Online]. Available at: https://library.lsbu.ac.uk/harvardreferencing (Accessed 15/02/2022).

University of Derby, (2021). A guide to Harvard Referencing [Online]. Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NDgqqPvMn0U (Accessed 15/02/2022).